The Great Push

Patrick MacGill’s autobiographical novel of life in the trenches in the early years of the First World War has many of the strengths of his first novels – Children of the Dead End and The Rat-Pit. It is written from first hand experience and gives an unromantic, unvarnished, private soldier’s account of war at the sharp end.As I discovered when researching MacGill and his army career for my introduction to Birlinn’s reprint of this book he had enlisted in the London Irish in September 1914. Like many Irishmen of the day he saw no problem about volunteering to fight in the army of what many of his countrymen saw as an occupying power – MacGill’s politics always seemed more to be class-based than deeply involved in questions of nationalism. MacGill was gassed in action in September 1915 and two weeks later was wounded in the arm at the battle of Loos on 28 October and invalided home. Although he remained in the army for the duration of the war it seems that the authorities found a more appropriate role for a talented writer than rifleman and he produced a number of other books about the war and ended up in the Intelligence Section of the War Office.
The Great Push is a classic account of men at war and in its brief compass gives many memorable pictures of the horror of war and men’s reaction to war.
For an article on MacGill and his work click here.

Click on the link below to connect to the amazon.co.uk website where this book can be purchased.

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